Saturday, October 4, 2014

Creuza de mä:
    Sinàn Capudàn Pasciá - Sinan Kapudan Pasha

Teste fascië 'nscià galéa
ë sciabbre se zeugan a lûn-a
a mæ a l'è restà duv'a a l'éa
pe nu remenalu ä furtûn-a
      Teste fasciate sulla galea
      le sciabole si giocano la luna
      la mia è rimasta dov'era
      per non stuzzicare la fortuna


intu mezu du mä gh'è 'n pesciu tundu
che quandu u vedde ë brûtte u va 'nsciù fundu
intu mezu du mä gh'è 'n pesciu palla
che quandu u vedde ë belle u vegne a galla
      in mezzo al mare c'è un pesce tondo
      che quando vede le brutte va sul fondo
      in mezzo al mare c'è un pesce palla
      che quando vede le belle viene a galla


E au postu d'i anni ch'ean dedexenueve
se sun piggiaë ë gambe e a mæ brasse neuve
d'allua a cansún l'à cantà u tambûu
e u lou s'è gangiou in travaggiu dûu
      E al posto degli anni che erano diciannove
      si sono presi le gambe e le mie braccia
      da allora la canzone l'ha cantata il tamburo
      e il lavoro è diventato fatica


vuga t'è da vugâ prexuné
e spuncia spuncia u remu fin au pë
vuga t'è da vugâ turtaiéu
e tia tia u remmu fin a u cheu
      voga devi vogare prigioniero
      e spingi spingi il remo fino al piede
      voga devi vogare imbuto (= mangione)
      e tira tira il remo fino al cuore


e questa a l'è a ma stöia e t'ä veuggiu cuntâ
'n po' primma ch'à vegiàià a me peste 'ntu murtä
e questa a l'è a memöia a memöia du Cigä
ma 'nsci libbri de stöia Sinán Capudán Pasciá
      e questa è la mia storia e te la voglio raccontare
      un po' prima che la vecchiaia mi pesti nel mortaio
      e questa è la memoria la memoria del Cicala
      ma sui libri di storia Sinán Capudán Pasciá


E suttu u timun du gran cäru
c'u muru 'nte 'n broddu de fàru
'na neutte ch'u freidu u te morde
u te giàscia u te spûa e u te remorde
      e sotto il timone del gran carro
      con la faccia in un brodo di farro
      una notte che il freddo ti morde
      ti mastica ti sputa e ti rimorde


e u Bey assettòu u pensa ä Mecca
e u vedde ë Urì 'nsce 'na secca
ghe giu u timùn a lebecciu
sarvàndughe a vitta e u sciabeccu
      e il Bey seduto pensa alla Mecca
      e vede le Uri su una secca
      gli giro il timone a libeccio
      salvandogli la vita e lo sciabecco


amü me bell'amü a sfurtûn-a a l'è 'n grifun
ch'u gia 'ngiu ä testa du belinun
amü me bell'amü a sfurtûn-a a l'è 'n belin
ch'ù xeua 'ngiu au cû ciû vixín
      amore mio bell'amore la sfortuna è un avvoltoio
      che gira intorno alla testa dell'imbecille
      amore mio bell'amore la sfortuna è un cazzo
      che vola intorno al sedere più vicino


e questa a l'è a ma stöia e t'ä veuggiu cuntâ
'n po' primma ch'à vegiàià a me peste 'ntu murtä
e questa a l'è a memöia a memöia du Cigä
ma 'nsci libbri de stöia Sinán Capudán Pasciá
      e questa è la mia storia e te la voglio raccontare
      un po' prima che la vecchiaia mi pesti nel mortaio
      e questa è la memoria la memoria del Cicala
      ma sui libri di storia Sinán Capudán Pasciá


E digghe a chi me ciamma rénegôu
che a tûtte ë ricchesse a l'argentu e l'öu
Sinán gh'a lasciòu de luxî au sü
giastemmandu Mumä au postu du Segnü
      E digli a chi mi chiama rinnegato
      che a tutte le ricchezze all'argento e all'oro
      Sinán ha concesso di luccicare al sole
      bestemmiando Maometto al posto del Signore


intu mezu du mä gh'è 'n pesciu tundu
che quandu u vedde ë brûtte u va 'nsciù fundu
intu mezu du mä gh'è 'n pesciu palla
che quandu u vedde ë belle u vegne a galla
      in mezzo al mare c'e un pesce tondo
      che quando vede le brutte va sul fondo
      in mezzo al mare c'è un pesce palla
      che quando vede le belle viene a galla


Sinàn Capudàn Pasciá © 1984 Fabrizio De André/Mauro Pagani

"Sinàn Capudàn Pasciá" is based on the story of a Genoese mariner, Scipione Cicala, who at a young age was captured in a battle with the Ottoman Navy and taken to Constantinople in 1561. As a Christian, he had to choose between either death or converting to Islam and becoming a member of the Janissaries, which began in the 14th century as an elite corps of slaves recruited from young Christian boys that formed the Ottoman Sultan's household troops and bodyguards. Cicala chose conversion and then rose to the highest ranks, gaining favor from Sultan Mechmed II who bestowed on him the honorary title Pasha and eventually appointed him as Grand Admiral (Kapudan Pasha) of the Ottoman Navy (1591-1595).







Bandaged heads on the galley,
sabers playing for the moon.
Mine stayed put
so as not to tempt fortune.





In the middle of the sea there’s a round fish
that, when it sees the ugly ones, swims to the bottom.
In the middle of the sea there’s a blowfish
that, when it sees the pretty ones, comes to the light.





And instead of my years, which were nineteen,
the legs and my arms were taken.
From then on the tambourine sang the song
and work became an effort.





Row, you have to row, prisoner,
and push, push the oar to your feet.
Row, you have to row, big eater,
and pull, pull the oar to your heart.





And this is my story and I want to tell it to you,
a little before old age grinds me in its mortar.
And this is the memory, the remembrance of Cicala,
but in the history books Sinan Kapudan Pasha.





And under the helm of the Big Dipper,
with face in a spelt broth
one night when the cold kills you,
chews you, spits you out and kills you again,





and the seated Bey thinks of Mecca
and sees the Uris on a shoal,
I turn the rudder to the southwest,
saving his life and his xebec.





My love, sweet love, misfortune is a vulture
that circles 'round the head of the imbecile.
My love, sweet love, misfortune is a dick
that flies too close around the ass.





And this is my story and I want to tell it to you,
a little before old age grinds me in its mortar.
And this is my memory, the remembrance of Cicala,
but in the history books Sinan Kapudan Pasha.





And tell anyone who calls me a renegade
that to all the riches, to silver and to gold,
Sinan agreed to glisten in the sunlight,
blaspheming Muhammad in place of the Lord.





In the middle of the sea there’s a round fish
that, when he sees the ugly ones, dives to the bottom.
In the middle of the sea there’s a blowfish
that, when he sees the pretty ones, comes to the light.

English translation © 2014 Dennis Criteser


Creuza de mä received both critical and popular acclaim upon its release. David Byrne told Rolling Stone that Creuza de mä was one of the ten most important works of the Eighties. The album grew out of a deep collaboration between Mauro Pagani, founding member of PFM, and De André. Pagani had been studying Mediterranean musics - Balkan, Greek, Turkish - and De André suggested that they make a Mediterranean album together, partly as an act of identity and a declaration of independence from the strains of Anglo-American music that were then dominant: rock, pop and electronic music. De André once stated that "music should be a cathartic event, but today's music is only amphetamine-like, and enervating." While granting that Americans made great music that he too was influenced by, he felt there were different ways and different roots that were being smothered by the mass commercialization and success of American popular music; Creuza de mä was to be a synthesis of Mediterranean sounds, and it was indeed a stark contrast to the music of the time. De André's lyrics are in Genovese, a dialect that over the centuries absorbed many Persian, Arabic, Turkish, Spanish, French and even English words, and Pagani's music combined folk instruments (oud, shehnai, doumbek, bazouki, bağlama) with contemporary instrumentation, including Synclavier, creating what might be called an ethnic/pop masterpiece.


De Andrè at Boccadasse, Genoa - 1976
Back to Album List         Back to Song List

No comments:

Post a Comment